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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
and backed by rwanda. rebels captured the eastern congo city of goma. this is just two and a half hours. >> the committee will come to order. good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today will regard the policy in the democratic republic of congo. this conflict was exacerbated by rwanda's interventions in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda supported militia who have lavished in continue to plague this region. the state department was unavailable to testify at her september 19. on this issue and the promise that the time to follow up with available to testify. in the aftermath of genocide, they've turned a blind eye to reports of resources from the drc and support issuing congo and its people. it seems the guilt of the clinton administration's colossal failure responding effectively as they did not commit genocide in rwanda has led to subsequent been reluctant to criticize her one day. with these u.n. reports on that government's behavior in the drc, as an ngo letter points out c
's over comments she allegedly made during the 1994 rwanda genocide and weeks after losing the biggest race of his life, mitt romney has found a new job. that's ahead. but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members a
to the united nations, susan rice comes under fire again. this time, it's over rwanda. let's go "outfront. >>> good evening, welcome, everyone. "outfront" tonight breaking news, president obama puts the syrian president on notice. the president is reacting to new evidence that assad's regime has started mixing chemicals to make deadly sarin gas, adding to its massive stockpile of chemical weapons. >> and today i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> assad is on the edge of president obama's so-called red line against syria. the president said this summer that syria's use or movement of chemical weapons could mean u.s. intervention. so outfront tonight, barbara star. how exactly -- how clear is the evidence that they are moving in a new step with chemical weapons. >> it was just over the weekend in the last few days the intelligence began coming in.
third story out front tonight, ambassador rice's role in rwanda. a group of religious leaders have opened a new line of attack on the woman believed to be the leading candidate for secretary of state. by questioning rice's role in the clinton administration during the rwanda again side. rick warren tweeted this. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador ric
they are unlikely to go as far as withdrawing embassadors. -- embassadors -- ambassadors. >> rwanda has rejected a report that says it was involved in the rebel goma capture rebel in congo -- the democratic republic of congo. the drc is now back in control -- control. in the uk, starbucks says it will start paying corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, nearly 25 years after a deadly gas attack, one kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was
brief. this working and training local communities for self protection was done in rwanda against the fdlr. i am not so sure about doing this in the congo. it is attractive to me, but i guess i would say it depends on the community. i would say the key here is to engage and embrace the congolese government at the most senior level, but not just the presidential level, which is why i keep talking about some kind of by national commission. then you can start penetrating those ministries which have the responsibility, even bring governors over so that you can do at the provincial level. i guess i think that the real heavy lift here is more on the diplomatic side, and working very carefully with the congolese government, which is essentially isolated and does not have much contact with our officials i remember about the army that was not paid -- officials. >> i remember about an army that was not paid. that says an awful lot about the nature and character of society. i think we all agree that if you have a security solution, but does not sit with the situation on the ground, it will s
't suggest that everything is perfect in countries like uganda, and rwanda and ethiopia and south africa, but nonetheless, there's been progress in all these places, and we sometimes had to work with people who weren't perfect, but this author made it sound as if she was somehow guilty by association with anything they did wrong, and somehow had picked the wrong people to try to work with. i thought it was an absurd argument, and it sort of contributes to the same tone we've been hearing the last few weeks. >> well, there have been all these things coming out that people have been lobbing her way, and does this need to be resolved one way or the other? the president now we're told might even wait several more weeks before making decisions, not clear whether that's going to take place, but meanwhile, you have john kerry, who is going to be holding hearings on benghazi. hillary clinton is going to be testifying when that report comes out. we expect it by next week at the latest. that is the investigative panel, which will be turned over to the senate and house foreign affairs and foreign r
to prevent crimes against humanity happening. after what has happened in rwanda in the 1990's, and in bosnia, the international community came up with an excellent idea after that, in establishing the international criminal court in july of 2002. after that, the responsibility is to protect in 2005. after that, the international community will understand that if a state cannot commit crimes against its own people. should the international community -- the syrian case officially approve that all of this discussion and all of that was untrue. we have been seeing crimes against humanity. we have been seeing war crimes committed by the regime, day-by- day. children, women -- we see all the time torture. children are being tortured. we have been seeing cases of rape in different areas. we have seen a systematic and widespread policy of targeting organization figures and leaders. these are crimes against amenity. despite all of that, we have five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against huma
. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. what is your sense how potent this is for president obama and whether or not he would take the step of taking out these facilities before this could happen? >> well i think we obviously known about the threat of syria's chemical weapons capability for a long time and this conflict has been going on now, getting close to two years. so we're a little bit late in the game to finally be worried about what might happen. in fact, there is actually a bigger risk in my view. it will be a tragedy if the weapons are used against the opposition in syria. but the potential for an even larger tragedy exists if the opposition gets hold of these chemical weapons, the terrorist elements in the opposition and sends them outside syria where they could be used by terrorists around the world. so the threat, although our immediate focus is the risk inside syria, i don't think we can ignore. i think america's focus ought to be the threat expandi
like rwanda and others that are critical to bring stability. there's a huge diplomatic element to this as well. it is critically important that the u.s. and u.n. engaged by high-level envoy to that region to make a critical difference in bringing the partners together. i know that secretary carson has been working on the issue and others have as well. this is something that does matter to us. there is incredible opportunity , economic opportunity for trade, partnerships with u.s. businesses, but we have to give them stability in order to take advantage of those opportunities. i thank the chairman for having this hearing and learning what more can do to help the situation in the eastern drc. >> thank you, i yield back. >> we will have two panels today. the first panel, we have assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs. the honorable john carson, assistant secretary of state for the bureau of african affairs. >> thank you, members of the committee. thank you for the opportunity to discuss the urgent crisis and the did not -- in the democratic republic of c
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if you look around the markets, you will see the authority. 90% of the world's population. they're going to see improvements in those lives. there will be issues, but the story is very strong and that is why we are seeing the story being very positive. >> tell us about the frontier markets because you cite the story of capital labor productivity. it will explode very dramatically? >> i think there is a clear delineation between the advanced emerging economies and the frontier economies, but our related or integrated it is to the developed market, how much exposure do they have? in terms of trade and foreign direct investment, it is heavily dependent on the united states and europe. africa has 1 billion people and is less than 2% of world trade or direct investment. the real engine of growth is not going to be trade, unfortunately. if you look at valuations of the bank's and trading in the local market, the story is credible and hits to the story rather than be
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)